The Job Search: Your Portfolio

Okay, creatives — this time, I’m looking at you. And I’m not just talking about visual artists, videographers, musicians…no. Anyone who has a body of work that they’ve done creatively, from white papers, lectures, online courses, or infographics, should have a place where their work is featured online.

I’m talking, of course, about the portfolio.

There are plenty of ways to format your portfolio, but the baseline is this:

Feature your best creative work in one, easy-to-use, easy-to search hub.

The idea is to make it easy for potential employers to find your work and hire you based on what you have featured. It should go to a permanent link that you can include on your resume, digital job applications, Twitter and LinkedIn profiles, and in the signature of your emails. The fewer clicks someone has to go through to find it, the better.

Profile the work that exemplifies the work you want to be doing.

If you want to be doing sequential work, feature sequential pages you’ve done in the past, in order of how much you like them. If you’re a musician, do the same with your demos. You can always rank your work depending on what you think others will like, but committing to your preference early will help you to get the work you enjoy and work you’re proud of, not just work-for-hire in a style that isn’t yours. By being intentional about the work you want to be doing, you can more easily find the clients who will be interested in that work, too.

At a bare minimum, your portfolio needs to include the following:

  • Your contact information (and how you prefer to be contacted)
    • Even better: Also include a timeframe in which you will respond to inquiries. This can save you a ton of headaches and emails, and gives you some breathing space when responding to potential jobs.
  • Your brand
    • Use the same avatar/icon you use on other social media, and choose a color scheme that looks good and represents you! This will reassure clients and potential employers that it is, in fact, your site, and they’ve found the portfolio they’re looking for.
  • Your work
    • Duh, right? Make sure it’s:
      • Easy to access
        • This is the most important part of your portfolio, so don’t hide it away! Make sure it’s easy to find and loads quickly.
      • Easy to scroll through
        • You don’t want to make someone click in and out of separate images. Make sure everything follows logically, and is formatted so someone can quickly go from one piece to the next.
      • Working as intended
        • No broken links!! Nothing will send a client away quicker than a site that doesn’t work.
        • Make sure your site isn’t internet-dependent, if you plan on walking around conventions or conferences and need to show it off!
  • Appearances
    • At conventions, conferences, etc — if you’re interested in networking, let people know where you’re going to be!
    • Past appearances: Do you have a talk that’s been recorded? Try and see if you can include a link to it.

Other things, like rates, can be included, though you can always opt to hide those or make them negotiable if you would rather not have a flat rate.

And, the biggest tip: Include only your best work. Employers and clients usually have limited time to make a decision, and won’t be scrolling through more than a few of your pieces before they decide whether or not they go further. Make a note on your calendar every 3 months to update your portfolio, and commit to keeping it up-to-date. Not only will the newer work hopefully be a better reflection of your current skill, but it also shows you’ve been continuously working, and are invested in your creative work. Just be careful not to include anything that may break a contract.

For visual artists, a mobile- and tablet-friendly solution is key. Though there are many sites and apps that are good ways to show your portfolio, comic artist, Hiveworks editor, and most importantly, my friend Sarah Stern suggests Minimal Folio for iOS ($3). It lets you display swipeable images — great for when you’re on the go and want an easy-to-use, sharp solution.

Your portfolio is going to be possibly your best resource for getting new work, so put the time into it that you put into yourself when interviewing and networking. And don’t be afraid to ask friends/industry peers for advice (if it’s someone you know well, or if someone offers), but keep to your own code, too. Not all advice will necessarily work for you!

Thank you to Sarah Stern for being a resource for me on this post!

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